Can You Notarize a Contract

If you`re wondering if you can notarize a contract, the short answer is yes, you can. However, there are some things you should be aware of before you do.

First, it`s important to understand what a notary public does. A notary public is a public official who verifies the identity of signers and witnesses, and who may administer oaths and affirmations. Notarization is often done to prevent fraud and to ensure that the person signing a document is doing so willingly and with full understanding of the contents of the document.

When it comes to contracts, notarization is not always required, but it can be a good idea in certain situations. For example, if the contract is particularly important or if you`re dealing with a large sum of money, having a notary public witness the signing can provide an extra layer of protection.

If you do decide to have your contract notarized, it`s important to make sure that the notary public is licensed in your state and that they have the proper training and experience. You should also make sure that the notary public is not a party to the contract, as this could create a conflict of interest.

Another important consideration is timing. Notarization usually takes place at the time of signing, so it`s important to make sure that all parties are present and ready to sign before you bring in the notary public. You should also make sure that everyone involved has had a chance to review the contract and ask any questions they may have before signing.

Finally, it`s worth noting that notarization does not make a contract legally binding. A contract is only legally binding if all parties agree to the terms and sign it willingly, regardless of whether it is notarized or not.

In summary, while notarization is not always required for contracts, it can provide an extra layer of protection and assurance that the signing parties are who they say they are and that they fully understand the contents of the contract. If you do decide to have your contract notarized, be sure to choose a licensed and experienced notary public, make sure all parties are present and ready to sign, and understand that notarization does not make a contract legally binding.